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It’s National Prevention Week!

Filed in Community/PACT, News, Parents, Youth by on May 15, 2017 • views: 353
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May 15-20, 2017

 

 

Today kicks off National Prevention Week from SAMHSA, which focuses on prevention tools and tactics to keep teens and young adults from using and abusing alcohol, drugs, tobacco and other drugs. Each day throughout the week, we’ll be sharing personal stories from organizations across the country who are doing what they can to prevent substance use and abuse in their areas.

Prevention of Youth Tobacco Use: Monday, May 15

First up, several counties in Rhode Island are incorporating teens into their work for preventing youth tobacco use. Check it out!

Prevention of Underage Drinking & Alcohol Misuse: Tuesday, May 16

In Cleveland County, North Carolina, there is a renewed commitment by law enforcement and local coalitions to help prevent underage drinking in the county. The groups are planning to continue to do such activities as training personnel on applicable rules and statutes governing underage drinking, implementing shoulder tap initiatives, and conducting routine alcohol compliance checks. Great job, NC!

Prevention of Prescription & Opioid Drug Misuse: Wednesday, May 17

In Ohio, students from 13 area high schools took some time earlier this month to learn about the danger of prescription painkillers and heroin at the youth summit, “Opiates: See it, SAY it, Stop it.

Lawmakers in Michigan and other states are considering requiring mandatory opioid abuse education in public schools, as a way to combat the addiction and overdose epidemic that’s happening across the country.

Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) is a program developed at the University of New Mexico that connects families struggling with addiction to other parents who understand their situation: “Walking this dark path with another parent somehow makes it seem more manageable.”

Prevention of Illicit Drug Use & Youth Marijuana Use: Thursday, May 18

Many anti-drug Coalitions across the country hosted events on April 20, which has become known in pop culture as a day for using marijuana (420). Instead, these groups hosted “Healthy Teen Brain Day” events, which were meant to honor teens making the decision not to use marijuana and providing alternative activities for them to participate in during that day. Westchester County participated in Healthy Teen Brain Day, with a giant inflatable brain set up, allowing visitors to literally walk through the teen brain and see for themselves the effects of marijuana.

In Routt County, Colorado, where marijuana has been legalized for recreational use, Grand Futures Prevention Coalition hosted a teen event that evening called Too Fly To Get High, which celebrated high school students who make safe & healthy choices regarding marijuana. Included at this free event were games such as poker and trivia, food, a photo booth, salsa dancing lessons, a fire dancing show, a palm reader, a DJ, and door prizes.

Prevention of Suicide: Friday, May 19

We’re heading West to California for today’s prevention article. Check out this Q&A with a Stanford University psychiatrist on preventing teen suicide:

“People in general support the idea that schools ought to be a place where children are mentally healthy, but to go from that to enacting a policy that requires school districts to teach their staff and students about suicide prevention, mental health and wellness is quite another challenge.”

Promotion of Mental Health & Wellness: Saturday, May 20

All throughout the month of May, organizations such as the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), Mental Health America, and SAMHSA are promoting awareness of mental health issues, encouraging people across the country to break the stigmas associated with mental illness. Visit our website, and be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to hear updates and see how you can help fight the stigma.

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